The Basics: White Bread

Though I am still out of it while recovering from my pulled tooth I had an idea. When I posted the “Basics” yesterday it occurred to me that I do a lot of things every day that I take for granted. For example, I was making bread for the week. This is something I do all the time. Its nothing special to me really. But it got me thinking; this is exactly the kind of thing I should be sharing! So here is my go to bread. Since the bread in the store is loaded with sodium and other crap that we just don’t need I set out to make a renal friendly white bread for sandwiches. I have been eating this bread for almost a year now. Hope you enjoy it!

Now just a heads up this recipe makes TWO loaves of bread. I suggest you freeze the second one in a Ziploc® bag until you need it.

 Ingredients:

  • 2 cups warm water (MUST be between 110 or 120 degrees)
  • 1/2 cup white sugar
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoons active dry yeast
  • 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 6 cups bread flour ~Since I’m a Southern man that means I’m a White Lily® man~

Directions:

In large bowl dissolve sugar in warm water then stir in yeast. Allow to proof until yeast resembles a creamy foam. I suggest waiting about ten minutes.

Mix salt & oil into the yeast, mix in flour, one cup at a time. Knead the dough on a lightly floured surface until smooth.

Roll the dough into a ball and place it in a well oiled bowl, cover with damp cloth, allow to rise until doubled about an hour.

Punch the dough down, knead it for a few minutes on lightly floured surface and divide it in half.

Then shape them into loaves and place them into two well oiled 9X5 inch loaf pans and allow them to rise for 30 minutes or until dough had risen 1 inch above pans.

Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.

Remove the bread from the pans as quick as you can and place them on a cooling rack. When they are cooled you will need to either wrap them or place them in a Ziploc® bag so they will not become to loaves of stone.

The Lazy Way:

In large bowl dissolve sugar in warm water then stir in yeast Allow to proof until yeast resembles a creamy foam. I suggest waiting about ten minutes.

Throw everything into a bread maker. Turn on the dough setting and let it do all the work.

The dough will rise much larger than the machine can hold. Once it rises up to the view window you take it out of the machine.

Cut the dough in two and then shape them into loaves and place them into two well oiled 9X5 inch loaf pans and allow them to rise for 30 minutes or until dough had risen 1 inch above pans.

Brush the top of the loaves with a little olive oil so you have a nice golden looking top to the bread. Because without it the bread looks kinda dull.

Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.

…….what? That’s what the machine is for! If you REALLY wanted to you could cut the recipe in half and just let the bread maker do everything for you. Why don’t I? Well I find the giant block that bread machines make are just too large for sandwiches.

Tip: If your like me and you like a little crust to your bread then leave the loaf out over night and it will build up a slightly chewy crust.

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Recipe Card

~This info is per slice not per loaf of bread.~

Calories 106.1

Total Fat 1.9 g

Saturated Fat 1.2 g

Polyunsaturated Fat 0.1 g

Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g

Cholesterol 0.0 mg

Sodium 35.1 mg

Potassium 26.1 mg

Total Carbohydrate 19.8 g

Dietary Fiber 0.6 g

Sugars 3.0 g

Protein 2.3 g

Vitamin A 0.0 %

Vitamin B-12 0.0 %

Vitamin B-6 0.5 %

Vitamin C 0.0 %

Vitamin D 0.0 %

Vitamin E 1.2 %

Calcium 0.4 %

Copper 1.6 %

Folate 10.1 %

Iron 5.7 %

Magnesium 1.2 %

Manganese 7.5 %

Niacin 6.5 %

Pantothenic Acid 1.0 %

Phosphorus 2.4 %

Riboflavin 6.4 %

Selenium 10.7 %

Thiamin 11.5 %

Zinc 1.0 %

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6 Responses to “The Basics: White Bread”

  1. drgirlfriend says:

    Thanks for posting this recipe! The little buggers are in the oven right now. I shouldn’t say little because they’re huge! I think I underproofed them on the second rise, and my bread forming skills are not very good. It wouldn’t surprise me if they’re tall because they came apart. 🙁 What technique do you use to form loaves?

    • I can’t believe I missed the question at the end. Wow, I am sooo sorry about that! Well after I cut the dough in two I just pat the dough into the shape of the baking pan and then I just place the dough in the pan. Usually, on the second rise the dough will conform to the shape of the pan. I hope that helps, though you have had months to figure it out on your own. :-p

      Keep being Awesome,
      Chris

      • Tmac says:

        Hey, thanks Chris! Count on me to overthink forming a loaf of sandwich bread. Glad you’re back and looking forward to what’s next!

  2. Thanks, and don’t feel bad I overthink things all the time.

  3. DevonTexas says:

    Thanks for the invitation to come here, Chris! I just may get back to my cooking hobby again with this inspiration. DevonTexas

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